Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene and 2D Nanomaterials in Electronics

Global Market for Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene and 2D Nanomaterials in Electronics

Future Markets, Date of Publication: Oct 20, 2015, 257 Pages
US$1,545.00
FM5180

Global Market for Carbon Nanotubes, Graphene and 2D Nanomaterials in Electronics

Due to their excellent optoelectrical performance, processability, stability, and high conductivity, CNT-based transparent electrode films have been put forward as a candidate to replace indium tin oxide (ITO) currently used in touchscreens and displays.

CNTs are deposited in thin films, leading to a conducting layer, which can also be transparent. In relation to ITO they are more cost effective, have higher resistivity and greater flexibility. Main applications of CNT in electronics are:

  • EMI shielding
  • Electronic textiles: Conductive and sensory textiles & fibers
  • Transparent conducting CNT-based coatings for lower cost and flexible displays and solar cells
  • Semiconducting materials in thin film transistors
  • Electronic circuits for lower power and higher speed enabling new device architectures
  • Improved heat dissipation in semiconductor chip packages
  • Conductive inks.

Graphene has remarkable electronic properties, with an extraordinarily high charge carrier mobility and conductivity. It is an excellent conductor, and transports electrons tens of times faster than silicon. These properties make it an ideal candidate for next generation electronic applications.

Near-medium term electronics applications for graphene are in radio-frequency identification tags, low-resolution displays and backlights, sensors, electrical contacts, analog signal processing and electronics packaging. Initially applications will be in low-end electronics, depending on the manufacturing cost. High-end electronics applications are more cost sensitive.

The scalability, reproducibility and cost effectiveness of integrating graphene into practical devices is currently under development. Graphene's success in transparent conductive films (TCFs) is also dependent on the development of competing alternative materials. The demand for TCFs is increasing significantly as electronic devices such as touch screens, displays, solid-state lighting and photovoltaics become ubiquitous.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

1. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

CARBON NANOTUBES
Exceptional properties
Products and applications
Threat from the graphene market
Production
Multi--walled nanotube (MWNT) production
Single--walled nanotube (SWNT) production
Global demand for carbon nanotubes
Current products
Future products
Market drivers and trends
Electronics
Market and production challenges
Safety issues
Dispersion
Synthesis and supply quality
Cost
Competition from other materials
 
GRAPHENE
Remarkable properties
Global funding
Products and applications
Production
Market drivers and trends
Production exceeds demand
Market revenues remain small but are growing
Scalability and cost
Applications hitting the market
Wait and see?
Asia and US lead the race
Competition from other materials
Market and technical challenges
Supply quality
Cost
Product integration
Regulation and standards

2. INTRODUCTION

Properties of nanomaterials
Categorization
 
CARBON NANOTUBES
Multi--walled nanotubes (MWNT)
Single--wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT)
Single--chirality
Double--walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs)
Few--walled carbon nanotubes (FWNTs)
Carbon Nanohorns (CNHs)
Fullerenes
Boron Nitride nanotubes (BNNTs)
Properties
Applications of carbon nanotubes
High volume applications
Low volume applications
Novel applications
 
GRAPHENE
3D Graphene
Graphene Quantum Dots
Properties
CARBON NANOTUBES VERSUS GRAPHENE
Cost and production
Carbon nanotube--graphene hybrids
 
OTHER 2D MATERIALS
Phosphorene
Properties
Applications
Recent research news
Silicene
Properties
Applications
Recent research news
Molybdenum disulfide
Properties
Applications
Recent research news
Hexagonal boron nitride
Properties
Applications
Recent research news
Germanene
Properties
Applications
Recent research news
Graphdiyne
Properties
Applications
Graphane
Properties
Applications
Stanene/tinene
Properties
Applications
Tungsten diselenide
Properties
Applications
Rhenium disulphide
Properties
Applications

3. PATENTS AND PUBLICATIONS

Carbon nanotubes
Graphene
Fabrication processes
Academia
Regional leaders

4. TECHNOLOGY READINESS LEVEL

5. END USER MARKET SEGMENT ANALYSIS

Carbon nanotubes production volumes 2010--2025
Regional demand for carbon nanotubes
Japan
China
Main carbon nanotubes producers
SWNT production
OCSiAl
FGV Cambridge Nanosystems
Zeon Corporation
Price of carbon nanotubes--MWNTs, SWNTs and FWNTs
Graphene production volumes 2010--2025
 
ELECTRONICS AND PHOTONICS
 
TRANSPARENT CONDUCTIVE FILMS AND DISPLAYS
MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS
MARKET SIZE AND OPPORTUNITY
Properties and applications
CHALLENGES
PRODUCT DEVELOPERS
 
CONDUCTIVE INKS
MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS
MARKET SIZE AND OPPORTUNITY
PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS
PRODUCT DEVELOPERS
 
TRANSISTORS AND INTEGRATED CIRCUITS
MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS
MARKET SIZE AND OPPORTUNITY
PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS
CHALLENGES
PRODUCT DEVELOPERS
MEMORY DEVICES
MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS
MARKET SIZE AND OPPORTUNITY
PROPERTIES AND APPLICATIONS
PRODUCT DEVELOPERS
 
PHOTONICS
Optical modulators
Photodetectors
Plasmonics
Challenges

6. CARBON NANOTUBES ELECTRONICS COMPANY PROFILES

7. GRAPHENE ELECTRONICS COMPANY PROFILES REFERENCES

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1: Properties of CNTs and comparable materials.
Table 2: Carbon nanotubes target markets--Applications, stage of commercialization and potential addressable market size.
Table 3: Annual production capacity of MWNT and SWNT producers.
Table 4: SWNT producers production capacities 2014.
Table 5: Global production of carbon nanotubes, 2010--2025 in tons/year. Base year for projections is 2014.
Table 6: Graphene target markets--Applications, stage of commercialization and potential addressable market size.
Table 7: Graphene producers annual production capacities.
Table 8: Global production of graphene, 2010--2025 in tons/year. Base year for projections is 2014.
Table 9: Graphene types and cost per kg.
Table 10: Categorization of nanomaterials.
Table 11: Comparison between single--walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and multi--walled carbon nanotubes.
Table 12: Properties of carbon nanotubes.
Table 13: Properties of graphene.
Table 14: Comparative properties of carbon materials.
Table 15: Comparative properties of graphene with nanoclays and carbon nanotubes.
Table 16: Recent phosphorene research news.
Table 17: Recent silicene research news.
Table 18: Recent Molybdenum disulfide research news.
Table 19: Recent hexagonal boron nitride research news.
Table 20: Recent germanane research news.
Table 21: Comparative analysis of graphene and other 2--D nanomaterials.
Table 22: Published patent publications for graphene, 2004--2014.
Table 23: Leading graphene patentees.
Table 24: Industrial graphene patents in 2014.
Table 25: Market penetration and volume estimates (tons) for carbon nanotubes and graphene in key applications.
Table 26: Global production of carbon nanotubes, 2010--2025 in tons/year. Base year for projections is 2014.
Table 34: Current carbon nanotubes prices.
Table 28: Global production of graphene, 2010--2025 in tons/year. Base year for projections is 2014.
Table 29: Carbon nanotubes in the electronics and photonics market-- applications, stage of commercialization and addressable market size.
Table 30: Graphene in the electronics and photonics market-- applications, stage of commercialization and addressable market size.
Table 31: Comparison of ITO replacements.
Table 32: Carbon nanotubes product and application developers in transparent conductive films and displays.
Table 33: Graphene product and application developers in transparent conductive films.
Table 34: Comparative properties of conductive inks.
Table 35: Carbon nanotubes product and application developers in conductive inks.
Table 36: Graphene product and application developers in conductive inks.
Table 37: Carbon nanotubes product and application developers in transistors and integrated circuits.
Table 38: Graphene product and application developers in transistors and integrated circuits.
Table 39: Carbon nanotubes product and application developers in memory devices.
Table 40: Graphene product and application developers in memory devices.
Table 41: Graphene properties relevant to application in optical modulators.

LIST OF FIGURES

Figure 1: Molecular structures of SWNT and MWNT.
Figure 2: Production capacities for SWNTs in kilograms, 2005--2014.
Figure 3: Global production of carbon nanotubes, 2010--2025 in tons/year. Base year for projections is 2014.
Figure 4: Global government funding for graphene.
Figure 5: Global market for graphene 2010--2025 in tons/year.
Figure 6: Conceptual diagram of single--walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) (A) and multi--walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) (B) showing typical dimensions of length, width, and separation distance between graphene layers in MWNTs.
Figure 7: Schematic of single--walled carbon nanotube.
Figure 8: Figure 8: Double--walled carbon nanotube bundle cross--section micrograph and model.
Figure 9: Schematic representation of carbon nanohorns.
Figure 10: Fullerene schematic.
Figure 11: Schematic of Boron Nitride nanotubes (BNNTs). Alternating B and N atoms are shown in blue and red.
Figure 12: Graphene layer structure schematic.
Figure 13: Graphite and graphene.
Figure 14: Graphene and its descendants: top right: graphene;; top left: graphite = stacked graphene;; bottom right: nanotube=rolled graphene;; bottom left: fullerene=wrapped graphene.
Figure 15: Graphene can be rolled up into a carbon nanotube, wrapped into a fullerene, and stacked into graphite.
Figure 16: Phosphorene structure.
Figure 17: Silicene structure.
Figure 18: Structure of 2D molybdenum disulfide.
Figure 19: Atomic force microscopy image of a representative MoS2 thin--film transistor.
Figure 20: Schematic of the molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) thin--film sensor with the deposited molecules that create additional charge.
Figure 21: Structure of hexagonal boron nitride.
Figure 22: Schematic of germanane.
Figure 23: Graphdiyne structure.
Figure 24: Schematic of Graphane crystal.
Figure 25: Crystal structure for stanene.
Figure 26: Schematic of tungsten diselenide.
Figure 27: Schematic of a monolayer of rhenium disulphide.
Figure 28: CNT patents filed 2000--2014.
Figure 29: Patent distribution of CNT application areas to 2014.
Figure 30: Published patent publications for graphene, 2004--2014.
Figure 31: Technology Readiness Level (TRL) for Carbon Nanotubes.
Figure 32: Technology Readiness Level (TRL) for graphene.
Figure 33: Regional demand for CNTs utilized in transparent conductive films and displays.
Figure 34: Regional demand for CNTs utilized in batteries.
Figure 35: Regional demand for CNTs utilized in Polymer reinforcement.
Figure 36: Global production of graphene, 2010--2025 in tons/year. Base year for projections is 2014.
Figure 37: A large transparent conductive graphene film (about 20 × 20 cm2) manufactured by 2D Carbon Tech.
Figure 38: CNT transparent conductive film formed on glass and schematic diagram of its structure.
Figure 39: Graphene electrochromic devices.
Figure 40: Flexible transistor sheet.
Figure 41: The transmittance of glass/ITO, glass/ITO/four organic layers, and glass/ITO/four organic layers/4--layer graphene.
Figure 42: Vorbeck Materials conductive ink products.
Figure 43: Nanotube inks.
Figure 44: Graphene printed antenna.
Figure 45: BGT Materials graphene ink product.
Figure 46: Schematic cross--section of a graphene base transistor (GBT, left) and a graphene field--effect transistor (GFET, right).
Figure 47: Thin film transistor incorporating CNTs.
Figure 48: Graphene IC in wafer tester.
Figure 49: Stretchable CNT memory and logic devices for wearable electronics.
Figure 50: SEM image of the deposited film (or fabric) of crossed nanotubes that can be either touching or slightly separated depending on their position.
Figure 51: Schematic of NRAM.
Figure 52: Schematic of NRAM cell.
Figure 53: Carbon nanotubes NRAM chip.
Figure 54: A schematic diagram for the mechanism of the resistive switching in metal/GO/Pt.
Figure 55: Hybrid graphene phototransistors.

 

Date of Publication:
Oct 20, 2015
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257 Pages
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