Global Market for Nanoelectronics: Materials and Devices

Global Market for Nanoelectronics: Materials and Devices

Future Markets, Date of Publication: Mar 7, 2019, 510 Pages
US$1,700.00
FM1725

The electronics industry will witness further significant change and growth in the next decade driven by:

  • Scaling
  • Growth of mobile wireless devices
  • Huge growth in the Internet of Things (IoT)
  • Development of flexible and stretchable form functions
  • Data, logic and applications moving to the Cloud
  • Ubiquitous electronics

To meet these market demands, power and functionality needs to improve hugely, while being cost effective, driving demand for nanomaterials that will allow for novel architectures, new types of energy harvesting and sensor integration. As well as allowing for greater power, improved performance and bandwith, decreased size and cost, improved flexibility and better thermal management, the exploitation of nanomaterials allows for new device designs, new package architectures, new network architectures and new manufacturing processes. This will lead to greater device integration and density, and reduced time to market.

Semiconducting inorganic nanowires (NWs), carbon nanotubes, nanofibers, nanofibers, quantum dots, graphene and other 2D materials have been extensively explored in recent years as potential building blocks for nanoscale electronics, optoelectronics and photonics components, coatings and devices.

The report covers nanotechnology and nanomaterials related to the following markets and applications:

  • Post-Silicon Materials and Devices
  • Flexible, Stretchable and Printable Electronics
  • Conductive inks
  • Wearable health monitoring
  • Electronic textiles
  • HMI automotive displays
  • Displays
  • Transistors
  • Integrated Circuits
  • Other components
  • Memory Devices
  • Conductive and waterproof electronics coatings
  • Photonics
  • Lighting
  • Solar cells

Global Market for Nanoelectronics
TABLE OF CONTENTS

1 RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

2 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

2.1 THE EVOLUTION OF ELECTRONICS

2.1.1 The wearables revolution 43

2.1.2 Flexible, thin, and large-area form factors 44

2.1.3 From rigid to flexible and stretchable 45

2.1.4 Organic and printed electronics 47

2.1.5 New conductive materials 48

2.2MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 51

2.2.1 Scaling 51

2.2.2 Growth of mobile wireless devices51

2.2.3 Internet of things (IoT) 51

2.2.4 Data, logic and applications moving to the Cloud 52

2.2.5 Ubiquitous electronics 52

2.2.5.1 ITO replacement for flexible electronics 53

2.2.5.2 Growth in the wearable electronics market 55

2.2.5.3 Growth in wearable health monitoring 55

2.2.5.4 Gowth of HMI and display systems in the automotive industry 56

2.2.5.5 Touch technology requirements 56

2.2.6 Nanomaterials for new device design and architectures56

2.2.7 Carbon and 2D nanomaterials 57

2.2.8 Industrial collaborations 58

3 NANOMATERIALS

3.1Properties of nanomaterials59

3.2Categorization 60

4 NANOMATERIALS IN ELECTRONICS

4.1 ALUMINIUM OXIDE NANOPARTICLES 64

4.1.1 Properties 64

4.1.2 Applications in nanoelectronics 64

4.2 ANTIMONY TIN OXIDE NANOPARTICLES 65

4.2.1 Properties 65

4.2.2 Applications in nanoelectronics 65

4.3 MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES

4.3.1 Properties 66

4.3.2 Applications in nanoelectronics 67

4.4 CONDUCTIVE POLYMERS (CP)

4.4.1 Properties 69

4.4.1.1 PDMS 69

4.4.1.2 PEDOT: PSS 69

4.4.2 Applications in nanoelectronics 70

4.5 CERIUM OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

4.5.1 Properties 71

4.5.2 Applications 71

4.6COPPER INK AND NANOPARTICLES 72

4.6.1 Silver-coated copper 73

4.6.2 Copper (Cu) nanoparticle ink 74

4.7GOLD NANOPARTICLES 74

4.7.1 Properties 74

4.7.2 Applications 75

4.8FULLERENES 75

4.8.1 Properties 76

4.8.2 Applications 76

4.9GRAPHENE 77

4.9.1 Properties 77

4.9.2 Applications in nanoelectronics 78

4.10 IRON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES 81

4.10.1Properties 81

4.10.2Applications 81

4.11 METAL MESH 82

4.11.1Properties 82

4.11.2Applications in nanoelectronics 84

4.12 NANOCELLULOSE

4.12.1Properties 85

4.12.2Applications in nanoelectronics 87

4.12.2.1 Nanopaper 90

4.12.2.2 Paper memory92

4.13 NANODIAMONDS

4.13.1Properties 93

4.13.2Applications 94

4.14 NANOFIBERS 95

4.14.1Properties 95

4.14.2Applications in nanoelectronics 96

4.15 NANOWIRES 97

4.15.1Properties 97

4.15.2Applications 97

4.16 NICKEL NANOPARTICLES 98

4.16.1Properties 98

4.16.2Applications 98

4.17 QUANTUM DOTS 99

4.17.1Properties 99

4.17.2Applications in nanoelectronics 101

4.18 SILICON OXIDE NANOPARTICLES104

4.18.1Properties 104

4.18.2Applications 105

4.19 SINGLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES 106

4.19.1Properties 106

4.19.2Applications in nanoelectronics 107

4.20 SILVER INK (Flake, nanoparticles, nanowires, ion) 108

4.20.1Silver flake 108

4.20.2Silver (Ag) nanoparticle ink 108

4.20.2.1 Conductivity 109

4.20.3Silver nanowires 109

4.20.4Prices 111

4.20.4.1 Cost for printed area 111

4.21 ZIRCONIUM OXIDE NANOPARTICLES 112

4.21.1Properties 112

4.21.2Applications in nanoelectronics 112

4.22 GRAPHENE AND CARBON QUANTUM DOTS 113

4.22.1Properties 114

4.22.2Applications in nanoelectronics 115

4.23 YTTRIUM OXIDE NANOPARTICLES 115

4.23.1Properties 116

4.23.2Applications in nanoelectronics 116

4.24 CARBON ONIONS 116

4.24.1Properties 116

4.24.2Applications in nanoelectronics 117

4.25 2D MATERIALS 118

4.25.1Black phosphorus/Phosphorene 118

4.25.1.1 Properties 118

4.25.1.2 Applications in electronics 119

4.25.2Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4)120

4.25.2.1 Properties 120

4.25.2.2 Applications in electronics 121

4.25.3Germanene 121

4.25.3.1 Properties 122

4.25.3.2 Applications in electronics 122

4.25.4Graphdiyne 122

4.25.4.1 Properties 123

4.25.4.2 Applications in electronics 123

4.25.5Graphane 123

4.25.5.1 Properties 124

4.25.5.2 Applications in electronics 124

4.25.6Hexagonal boron nitride 124

4.25.6.1 Properties 125

4.25.6.2 Applications in electronics 125

4.25.7Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) 126

4.25.7.1 Properties 126

4.25.7.2 Applications in electronics 127

4.25.8Rhenium disulfide (ReS2) and diselenide (ReSe2) 128

4.25.8.1 Properties 129

4.25.8.2 Applications in electronics 129

4.25.9Silicene 129

4.25.9.1 Properties 130

4.25.9.2 Applications in electronics 130

4.25.10 Stanene/tinene131

4.25.10.1Properties 132

4.25.10.2Applications in electronics 132

4.25.11 Tungsten diselenide 133

4.25.11.1Properties 133

4.25.11.2Applications in electronics 133

4.25.12 Antimonene 133

4.25.12.1Properties 134

4.25.12.2Applications in electronics 134

4.25.13 Indium selenide 134

4.25.13.1Properties 134

4.25.13.2Applications in electronics 135

5 MARKET ANALYSIS

5.1 CONDUCTIVE INKS 136

5.1.1 MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 136

5.1.2 CONDUCTIVE INK TYPES 137

5.1.3 PRINTING METHODS 138

5.1.3.1 Nanoparticle ink 141

5.1.4 Sintering 141

5.1.5 Conductive Filaments 142

5.1.6 Conductive films, foils and grids 142

5.1.7 Inkjet printing In flexible electronics 142

5.1.8 APPLICATIONS 142

5.1.8.1 Current products143

5.1.8.2 Advanced materials solutions 143

5.1.8.3 RFID 147

5.1.8.4 Smart labels 149

5.1.8.5 Smart clothing 149

5.1.8.6 Printable sensors 149

5.1.8.7 Printed batteries 150

5.1.8.8 Printable antennas 151

5.1.8.9 In-mold electronics 152

5.1.8.10 Printed transistors 153

5.1.9 GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 154

5.1.10COMPANY PROFILES 156 (112 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.2 WEARABLE NANOELECTRONICS, SENSORS AND ELECTRONIC TEXTILES 192

5.2.1 MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 192

5.2.2 APPLICATIONS 194

5.2.2.1 Current state of the art 195

5.2.2.2 Advanced materials solutions 196

5.2.2.3 Transparent conductive films 197

5.2.2.4 Carbon nanotubes (SWNT) 200

5.2.2.5 Double-walled carbon nanotubes 201

5.2.2.6 Graphene 201

5.2.2.7 Silver nanowires 202

5.2.2.8 Nanocellulose 203

5.2.2.9 Copper nanowires 205

5.2.2.10 Nanofibers 206

5.2.2.11 Wearable sensors 206

5.2.2.12 Advanced materials solutions 208

5.2.2.13 Wearable gas sensors 212

5.2.2.14 Wearable strain sensors 212

5.2.2.15 Wearable tactile sensors 212

5.2.2.16 Industrial monitoring 213

5.2.2.17 Military 213

5.2.3 GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 214

5.2.3.1 Transparent conductive electrodes 215

5.2.4 COMPANY PROFILES 216 (65 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.3MEDICAL AND HEALTHCARE ELECTRONIC TEXTILES AND WEARABLES 238

5.3.1 MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 238

5.3.2 APPLICATIONS 240

5.3.2.1 Current state of the art 240

5.3.2.2 Advanced materials solutions 244

5.3.2.3 Printable, flexible and stretchable health monitors 245

5.3.3 GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 253

5.3.4 COMPANY PROFILES 255 (41 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.4ELECTRONIC TEXTILES AND APPAREL 268

5.4.1 MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 268

5.4.2 APPLICATIONS 269

5.4.2.1 Current state of the art 269

5.4.2.2 Advanced materials solutions 270

5.4.3 GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 279

5.4.4 COMPANY PROFILES 281 (38 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.5ENERGY HARVESTING TEXTILES 292

5.5.1 MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 292

5.5.2 APPLICATIONS 293

5.5.2.1 Current state of the art 293

5.5.2.2 Advanced materials solutions 296

5.5.3 GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 302

5.5.4 COMPANY PROFILES 304 (21 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.6HDTVS AND OTHER DISPLAYS 311

5.6.1 MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 311

5.6.2 APPLICATIONS 313

5.6.2.1 Transparent electrodes 313

5.6.2.2 Automotive HMI and displays 315

5.6.2.3 Quantum dot displays 316

5.6.2.4 LCDS vsOLEDs vsQD-LCDs/QLEDs 316

5.6.2.5 QD-LCD TVs/QLEDs 318

5.6.2.6 Micro-LEDs 318

5.6.2.7 Synthesis and manufacturing 319

5.6.2.8 On-edge (edge optic) 323

5.6.2.9 On-surface (film)323

5.6.2.10 QD colour filter (QDF) 323

5.6.2.11 On-chip 324

5.6.2.12 Active Matrix Quantum-dot Light Emitting Diode (AMQLED) 324

5.6.2.13 QD Glass LGP 324

5.6.2.14 Quantum dot/OLED hybrid325

5.6.2.15 Quantum rods 326

5.6.2.16 Quantum converters with red phosphors 326

5.6.2.17 Electroluminescent (EL)QD displays 327

5.6.2.18 Flexible displays 327

5.6.3 GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 334

5.6.3.1 OLED market 334

5.6.3.2 QD-TV unit sales 2016-2030 334

5.6.3.3 QD Monitor Unit sales 2015-2030 335

5.6.4 COMPANY PROFILES 336 (53 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.7TRANSISTORS, INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND OTHER COMPONENTS 357

5.7.1 MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 357

5.7.2 APPLICATIONS 360

5.7.2.1 Nanowires 362

5.7.2.2 Carbon nanotubes 364

5.7.2.3 Graphene 366

5.7.2.4 Other 2D Materials 368

5.7.2.5 Quantum dots 368

5.7.3 GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 369

5.7.5 COMPANY PROFILES 373 (20 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.8MEMORY DEVICES 381

5.8.1 MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 381

5.8.2 APPLICATIONS 382

5.8.2.1 Graphene and other 2D materials 385

5.8.2.2 Magnetic nanoparticles 387

5.8.3 GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 387

5.8.4 MARKET CHALLENGES 388

5.8.5 COMPANY PROFILES 389 (10 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.9ELECTRONICS COATINGS 394

5.9.1 MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 394

5.9.2 APPLICATIONS 399

5.9.2.1 Waterproof nanocoatings 401

5.9.2.2 Anti-fingerprint nanocoatings 402

5.9.2.3 Anti-reflection nanocoatings 404

5.9.3 GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 405

5.9.4 COMPANY PROFILES 408 (25 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.10 SOLAR 418

5.10.1MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 419

5.10.2APPLICATIONS 420

5.10.2.1 ITO replacement 420

5.10.2.2 Nanomaterials in solar cells 421

5.10.2.3 Nanocrystalline thin-film layers 422

5.10.2.4 TiO2 nanoparticles in dye solar cells 422

5.10.2.5 Fullerenes 423

5.10.2.6 Graphene 424

5.10.2.7 Nanocoatings426

5.10.2.8 Quantum wells 426

5.10.2.9 Metal nanoparticle plasmonic solar cells 427

5.10.2.10Polymer-nanowire based hybrid solar cell 428

5.10.2.11Quantum dots 428

5.10.3GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 432

5.10.4COMPANY PROFILES 434 (40 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.11 LIGHTING 436

5.11.1MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 436

5.11.2APPLICATIONS 439

5.11.2.1 LED lighting 439

5.11.2.2 Horticultural lighting 441

5.11.2.3 Flexible OLED lighting 441

5.11.2.4 Quantum dot lighting 442

5.11.3GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 443

5.11.4COMPANY PROFILES 445 (20 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.12 PHOTONICS 448

5.12.1MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 448

5.12.2APPLICATIONS 448

5.12.2.1 Si photonics versus graphene 449

5.12.2.2 Optical modulators 450

5.12.2.3 Photodetectors 450

5.12.2.4 Plasmonics452

5.12.2.5 Fiber lasers452

5.12.3GLOBAL MARKET SIZE 453

5.12.4COMPANY PROFILES 454 (15 COMPANY PROFILES)

5.13 SENSORS 460

5.13.1MARKET DRIVERS AND TRENDS 460

5.13.2APPLICATIONS 462

5.13.2.1 Gas sensors 464

5.13.2.2 Infrared (IR) sensors 465

5.13.2.3 Electrochemical and gas sensors 466

5.13.2.4 Pressure sensors 467

5.13.2.5 Biosensors 467

5.13.2.6 Optical sensors 470

5.13.2.7 Humidity sensors 470

5.13.2.8 Strain sensors 471

5.13.2.9 Acoustic sensors 471

5.13.2.10Wireless sensors 471

5.13.2.11Surface enhanced Raman scattering 471

5.13.2.12Image sensors 472

5.13.3GLOBAL MARKET SIZE AND 472

5.13.4COMPANY PROFILES 473 (30 COMPANY PROFILES)

6 REFERENCES



TABLES

Figure 1: Evolution of electronics 43

Figure 2: Wove Band47

Figure 3: Wearable graphene medical sensor 48

Figure 4: Applications timeline for organic and printed electronics 49

Figure 5: A large transparent conductive graphene film (about 20 × 20 cm2) manufactured by 2D Carbon TechFigure 24a (right): Prototype of a mobile phone produced by 2D Carbon Tech using a graphene touch panel 56

Figure 6: The Tesla S’s touchscreen interface 57

Figure 7: Copper based inks on flexible substrate 74

Figure 8: Graphene layer structure schematic 79

Figure 9: Flexible graphene touch screen 80

Figure 10: Foldable graphene E-paper 81

Figure 11: Large-area metal mesh touch panel 84

Figure 12: Hierarchical Structure of Wood Biomass 86

Figure 13: Types of nanocellulose 87

Figure 14: Cellulose nanofiber films 89

Figure 15: Electronics markets and applications of nanocellulose 89

Figure 16: LEDs shining on circuitry imprinted on a 5x5cm sheet of CNF90

Figure 17: Nanocellulose photoluminescent paper 91

Figure 18: Foldable nanopaper 92

Figure 19: Foldable nanopaper antenna 92

Figure 20: Paper memory (ReRAM) 93

Figure 21: Quantum dot 101

Figure 22: The light-blue curve represents a typical spectrum from a conventional white-LED LCD TVWith quantum dots, the spectrum is tunable to any colours of red, green, and blue, and each Color is limited to a narrow band101

Figure 23: Flexible & stretchable LEDs based on quantum dots 104

Figure 24: Schematic of single-walled carbon nanotube 107

Figure 25: Stretchable SWNT memory and logic devices for wearable electronics 108

Figure 26: Silver nanocomposite ink after sintering and resin bonding of discrete electronic components 110

Figure 27: Flexible silver nanowire wearable mesh 112

Figure 28: Applications of yttrium oxide nanoparticles 117

Figure 29: TEM image of carbon onion 118

Figure 30: Black phosphorus structure 119

Figure 31: Black Phosphorus crystal120

Figure 32: Bottom gated flexible few-layer phosphorene transistors with the hydrophobic dielectric encapsulation 121

Figure 33: Graphitic carbon nitride122

Figure 34: Schematic of germanene122

Figure 35: Graphdiyne structure 124

Figure 36: Schematic of Graphane crystal 125

Figure 37: Structure of hexagonal boron nitride 126

Figure 38: Structure of 2D molybdenum disulfide 127

Figure 39: SEM image of MoS2 128

Figure 40: Atomic force microscopy image of a representative MoS2 thin-film transistor 128

Figure 41: Schematic of the molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) thin-film sensor with the deposited molecules that create additional charge 129

Figure 42: Schematic of a monolayer of rhenium disulphide 130

Figure 43: Silicene structure 131

Figure 44: Monolayer silicene on a silver (111) substrate131

Figure 45: Silicene transistor132

Figure 46: Crystal structure for stanene 133

Figure 47: Atomic structure model for the 2D stanene on Bi2Te3(111)133

Figure 48: Schematic of tungsten diselenide 134

Figure 49: Schematic of Indium Selenide (InSe) 135

Figure 50: BGT Materials graphene ink product 148

Figure 51: Flexible RFID tag 149

Figure 52: Enfucell Printed Battery 152

Figure 53: Graphene printed antenna 152

Figure 54: Printed antennas for aircraft 153

Figure 55: Stretchable material for formed an in-molded electronics 153

Figure 56: Wearable patch with a skin-compatible, pressure-sensitive adhesive 154

Figure 57: Thin film transistor incorporating CNTs 154

Figure 58: Conductive inks in the wearable electronics market 2017-2027 revenue forecast (million $), by ink types156

Figure 59: Covestro wearables 197

Figure 60: Royole flexible display 198

Figure 61: Panasonic CNT stretchable Resin Film 200

Figure 62: Bending durability of Ag nanowires 204

Figure 63: NFC computer chip 205

Figure 64: NFC translucent diffuser schematic 206

Figure 65: Softceptor sensor207

Figure 66: BeBop Media Arm Controller 208

Figure 67: LG Innotek flexible textile pressure sensor 208

Figure 68: C2Sense flexible sensor 209

Figure 69: <hitoe> nanofiber conductive shirt original design(top) and current design (bottom)210

Figure 70: Garment-based printable electrodes 211

Figure 71: Wearable gas sensor 213

Figure 72: BeBop Sensors Marcel Modular Data Gloves 214

Figure 73: BeBop Sensors Smart Helmet Sensor System 214

Figure 74: Torso and Extremities Protection (TEP) system 215

Figure 75: Global market for wearable electronics, 2015-2027, by application, billions $Figures do not include medical smart wearables and textiles and smart glasses 216

Figure 76: Global transparent conductive electrodes market forecast by materials type, 2012-2027, millions $ 217

Figure 77: BITalino systems 224

Figure 78: Connected human body 241

Figure 79: Flexible, lightweight temperature sensor 242

Figure 80: Prototype ECG sensor patch 245

Figure 81: Graphene-based E-skin patch 246

Figure 82: Wearable bio-fluid monitoring system for monitoring of hydration 247

Figure 83: Smart mouth guard 248

Figure 84: Smart e-skin system comprising health-monitoring sensors, displays, and ultra flexible PLEDs 249

Figure 85: Graphene medical patch 249

Figure 86: TempTraQ wearable wireless thermometer 250

Figure 87: Mimo baby monitor 250

Figure 88: Nanowire skin hydration patch 251

Figure 89: Wearable sweat sensor 251

Figure 90: GraphWear wearable sweat sensor 252

Figure 91: My UV Patch 253

Figure 92: Overview layers of L’Oreal skin patch 254

Figure 93: Global medical and healthcare smart textiles and wearables market, 2015-2027, billions $ 255

Figure 94: Global medical and healthcare smart textiles and wearables market, 2015-2027, billions $ 255

Figure 95: Omniphobic-coated fabric 272

Figure 96: Conductive yarns 276

Figure 97: Work out shirt incorporating ECG sensors, flexible lights and heating elements 278

Figure 98: BeBop Sensors Smart Helmet Sensor System 279

Figure 99: Schematic illustration of the fabrication concept for textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) made by sewing textile electrodes onto cloth or paper279

Figure 100: Global smart clothing, interactive fabrics and apparel market 2013-2027 revenue forecast (million $)280

Figure 101 Global smart clothing, interactive fabrics and apparel sales by market segment, 2016 281

Figure 102: Energy harvesting textile 294

Figure 103: StretchSense Energy Harvesting Kit 295

Figure 104: LG Chem Heaxagonal battery 296

Figure 105: Printed 1.5V battery 297

Figure 106: Energy densities and specific energy of rechargeable batteries 298

Figure 107: Stretchable graphene supercapacitor299

Figure 108: Schematic illustration of the fabrication concept for textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) made by sewing textile electrodes onto cloth or paper 301

Figure 109: Demand for thin film, flexible and printed batteries 2015, by market 304

Figure 110: Demand for thin film, flexible and printed batteries 2027, by market 305

Figure 111: Samsung QD-LCD TVs, UHD range 312

Figure 112: Samsung QLED TV range 313

Figure 113: Graphene-enabled bendable smartphone 314

Figure 114: 3D printed carbon nanotube sensor 315

Figure 115: Bosch automotive touchscreen with haptic feedback 316

Figure 116: Canatu’s CNB™ touch sensor 317

Figure 117: Quantum dot LED backlighting schematic 319

Figure 118: Individual red, green and blue microLED arrays based on quantum dots 320

Figure 119: Methods for integrating QDs into LCD System(a) On-chip (b) On-edge(c) On-surface 323

Figure 120: On-edge configuration 324

Figure 121: QD-film integration into a standard LCD display 324

Figure 122: Inkjet-printed pattern on a QDCF 325

Figure 123: Samsung 8K 65″ QD Glass 326

Figure 124: Schematic of Quantum Dot on Glass326

Figure 125: QD/OLED hybrid schematic 327

Figure 126: LCD using Quantum rods (right) versus a standard LCD 327

Figure 127: Quantum phosphor schematic in LED TV backlight 328

Figure 128: The Wall microLED display 328

Figure 129: Carbon nanotubes flexible, rechargeable yarn batteries incorporated into flexible, rechargeable yarn batteries 329

Figure 130: Ink-jet printed 5-inch AM-QLED display (80 dpi) 330

Figure 131: Flexible LCD 330

Figure 132: “Full ActiveTM Flex” 331

Figure 133: FOLED schematic 332

Figure 134: Foldable display332

Figure 135: Stretchable AMOLED 333

Figure 136: LGD 12.3” FHD Automotive OLED 333

Figure 137: LECTUM® display 334

Figure 138: Flexible & stretchable LEDs based on quantum dots 334

Figure 139: QD-TV unit sales 2016-2030, conservative estimates 335

Figure 140: QD-TV unit sales 2016-2030, optimistic estimates 336

Figure 141: QD Monitor Unit sales 2015-2030 337

Figure 142: Transistor architecture trend chart 359

Figure 143: CMOS Technology Roadmap 360

Figure 144: Emerging logic devices 363

Figure 145: Figure 38: Thin film transistor incorporating CNTs 366

Figure 146: Graphene IC in wafer tester 368

Figure 147: Emerging logic devices 371

Figure 148: Schematic of NRAM cell 386

Figure 149: A schematic diagram for the mechanism of the resistive switching in metal/GO/Pt387

Figure 150: Phone coated in WaterBlock submerged in water tank 397

Figure 151: Demo solar panels coated with nanocoatings 400

Figure 152: Schematic of barrier nanoparticles deposited on flexible substrates 402

Figure 153: Schematic of anti-fingerprint nanocoatings404

Figure 154: Toray anti-fingerprint film (left) and an existing lipophilic film (right) 405

Figure 155: Schematic of AR coating utilizing nanoporous coating 406

Figure 156: Schematic of KhepriCoat®Image credit: DSM 407

Figure 157: Nanocoating submerged in water 409

Figure 158: Solar cell with nanowires and graphene electrode 422

Figure 159: Schematic illustration of the fabrication concept for textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) made by sewing textile electrodes onto cloth or paper 426

Figure 160: (a) Schematic of Schottky barrier quantum dots based solar cell 430

Figure 161: Schematic of QD Solar Cell 431

Figure 162: Doped quantum dot LSC 431

Figure 163: QD coated solar windows 432

Figure 164: A layer of highly emissive manganese-doped quantum dots onto the outside surface of the outer glass pane (top layer on the left image below) and a layer of copper indium selenide quantum dots onto the inner surface of the inside (bottom) pane 433

Figure 165: QDSSC Module 433

Figure 166: Total QD photovoltaics component revenues 2013-2030 ($100,000s), conservative and optimistic estimates 435

Figure 167: Fourth generation QD-LEDs 441

Figure 168: LG OLED flexible lighting panel 443

Figure 169: Flexible OLED incorporated into automotive headlight 443

Figure 170: Flexible & stretchable LEDs based on quantum dots 444

Figure 171: Total nanotechnology lighting component revenues 2013-2027 ($M), conservative and optimistic estimates 446

Figure 172: Hybrid graphene phototransistors 452

Figure 173: Schematic of QD laser device 454

Figure 174: GFET sensors 467

Figure 175: First generation point of care diagnostics 469

Figure 176: Graphene Field Effect Transistor Schematic 470

FIGURES

Figure 1: Evolution of electronics 42

Figure 2: Wove Band46

Figure 3: Wearable graphene medical sensor 47

Figure 4: Applications timeline for organic and printed electronics 48

Figure 5: A large transparent conductive graphene film (about 20 × 20 cm2) manufactured by 2D Carbon TechFigure 24a (right): Prototype of a mobile phone produced by 2D Carbon Tech using a graphene touch panel 55

Figure 6: The Tesla S’s touchscreen interface 56

Figure 7: Copper based inks on flexible substrate 73

Figure 8: Graphene layer structure schematic 78

Figure 9: Flexible graphene touch screen 79

Figure 10: Foldable graphene E-paper 80

Figure 11: Large-area metal mesh touch panel 83

Figure 12: Hierarchical Structure of Wood Biomass 85

Figure 13: Types of nanocellulose 86

Figure 14: Cellulose nanofiber films 88

Figure 15: Electronics markets and applications of nanocellulose 88

Figure 16: LEDs shining on circuitry imprinted on a 5x5cm sheet of CNF89

Figure 17: Nanocellulose photoluminescent paper 90

Figure 18: Foldable nanopaper 91

Figure 19: Foldable nanopaper antenna 91

Figure 20: Paper memory (ReRAM) 92

Figure 21: Quantum dot 100

Figure 22: The light-blue curve represents a typical spectrum from a conventional white-LED LCD TVWith quantum dots, the spectrum is tunable to any colours of red, green, and blue, and each Color is limited to a narrow band100

Figure 23: Flexible & stretchable LEDs based on quantum dots 103

Figure 24: Schematic of single-walled carbon nanotube 106

Figure 25: Stretchable SWNT memory and logic devices for wearable electronics 107

Figure 26: Silver nanocomposite ink after sintering and resin bonding of discrete electronic components 109

Figure 27: Flexible silver nanowire wearable mesh 111

Figure 28: Applications of yttrium oxide nanoparticles 116

Figure 29: TEM image of carbon onion 117

Figure 30: Black phosphorus structure 118

Figure 31: Black Phosphorus crystal119

Figure 32: Bottom gated flexible few-layer phosphorene transistors with the hydrophobic dielectric encapsulation 120

Figure 33: Graphitic carbon nitride121

Figure 34: Schematic of germanene121

Figure 35: Graphdiyne structure 123

Figure 36: Schematic of Graphane crystal 124

Figure 37: Structure of hexagonal boron nitride 125

Figure 38: Structure of 2D molybdenum disulfide 126

Figure 39: SEM image of MoS2 127

Figure 40: Atomic force microscopy image of a representative MoS2 thin-film transistor 127

Figure 41: Schematic of the molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) thin-film sensor with the deposited molecules that create additional charge 128

Figure 42: Schematic of a monolayer of rhenium disulphide 129

Figure 43: Silicene structure 130

Figure 44: Monolayer silicene on a silver (111) substrate130

Figure 45: Silicene transistor131

Figure 46: Crystal structure for stanene 132

Figure 47: Atomic structure model for the 2D stanene on Bi2Te3(111)132

Figure 48: Schematic of tungsten diselenide 133

Figure 49: Schematic of Indium Selenide (InSe) 134

Figure 50: BGT Materials graphene ink product 147

Figure 51: Flexible RFID tag 148

Figure 52: Enfucell Printed Battery 151

Figure 53: Graphene printed antenna 151

Figure 54: Printed antennas for aircraft 152

Figure 55: Stretchable material for formed an in-molded electronics 152

Figure 56: Wearable patch with a skin-compatible, pressure-sensitive adhesive 153

Figure 57: Thin film transistor incorporating CNTs 153

Figure 58: Conductive inks in the wearable electronics market 2017-2027 revenue forecast (million $), by ink types155

Figure 59: Covestro wearables 196

Figure 60: Royole flexible display 197

Figure 61: Panasonic CNT stretchable Resin Film 199

Figure 62: Bending durability of Ag nanowires 203

Figure 63: NFC computer chip 204

Figure 64: NFC translucent diffuser schematic 205

Figure 65: Softceptor sensor206

Figure 66: BeBop Media Arm Controller 207

Figure 67: LG Innotek flexible textile pressure sensor 207

Figure 68: C2Sense flexible sensor 208

Figure 69: <hitoe> nanofiber conductive shirt original design(top) and current design (bottom)209

Figure 70: Garment-based printable electrodes 210

Figure 71: Wearable gas sensor 212

Figure 72: BeBop Sensors Marcel Modular Data Gloves 213

Figure 73: BeBop Sensors Smart Helmet Sensor System 213

Figure 74: Torso and Extremities Protection (TEP) system 214

Figure 75: Global market for wearable electronics, 2015-2027, by application, billions $Figures do not include medical smart wearables and textiles and smart glasses 215

Figure 76: Global transparent conductive electrodes market forecast by materials type, 2012-2027, millions $ 216

Figure 77: BITalino systems 223

Figure 78: Connected human body 240

Figure 79: Flexible, lightweight temperature sensor 241

Figure 80: Prototype ECG sensor patch 244

Figure 81: Graphene-based E-skin patch 245

Figure 82: Wearable bio-fluid monitoring system for monitoring of hydration 246

Figure 83: Smart mouth guard 247

Figure 84: Smart e-skin system comprising health-monitoring sensors, displays, and ultra flexible PLEDs 248

Figure 85: Graphene medical patch 248

Figure 86: TempTraQ wearable wireless thermometer 249

Figure 87: Mimo baby monitor 249

Figure 88: Nanowire skin hydration patch 250

Figure 89: Wearable sweat sensor 250

Figure 90: GraphWear wearable sweat sensor 251

Figure 91: My UV Patch 252

Figure 92: Overview layers of L’Oreal skin patch 253

Figure 93: Global medical and healthcare smart textiles and wearables market, 2015-2027, billions $ 254

Figure 94: Global medical and healthcare smart textiles and wearables market, 2015-2027, billions $ 254

Figure 95: Omniphobic-coated fabric 271

Figure 96: Conductive yarns 275

Figure 97: Work out shirt incorporating ECG sensors, flexible lights and heating elements 277

Figure 98: BeBop Sensors Smart Helmet Sensor System 278

Figure 99: Schematic illustration of the fabrication concept for textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) made by sewing textile electrodes onto cloth or paper278

Figure 100: Global smart clothing, interactive fabrics and apparel market 2013-2027 revenue forecast (million $)279

Figure 101 Global smart clothing, interactive fabrics and apparel sales by market segment, 2016 280

Figure 102: Energy harvesting textile 293

Figure 103: StretchSense Energy Harvesting Kit 294

Figure 104: LG Chem Heaxagonal battery 295

Figure 105: Printed 1.5V battery 296

Figure 106: Energy densities and specific energy of rechargeable batteries 297

Figure 107: Stretchable graphene supercapacitor298

Figure 108: Schematic illustration of the fabrication concept for textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) made by sewing textile electrodes onto cloth or paper 300

Figure 109: Demand for thin film, flexible and printed batteries 2015, by market 303

Figure 110: Demand for thin film, flexible and printed batteries 2027, by market 304

Figure 111: Samsung QD-LCD TVs, UHD range 311

Figure 112: Samsung QLED TV range 312

Figure 113: Graphene-enabled bendable smartphone 313

Figure 114: 3D printed carbon nanotube sensor 314

Figure 115: Bosch automotive touchscreen with haptic feedback 315

Figure 116: Canatu’s CNB™ touch sensor 316

Figure 117: Quantum dot LED backlighting schematic 318

Figure 118: Individual red, green and blue microLED arrays based on quantum dots 319

Figure 119: Methods for integrating QDs into LCD System(a) On-chip (b) On-edge(c) On-surface 322

Figure 120: On-edge configuration 323

Figure 121: QD-film integration into a standard LCD display 323

Figure 122: Inkjet-printed pattern on a QDCF 324

Figure 123: Samsung 8K 65″ QD Glass 325

Figure 124: Schematic of Quantum Dot on Glass325

Figure 125: QD/OLED hybrid schematic 326

Figure 126: LCD using Quantum rods (right) versus a standard LCD 326

Figure 127: Quantum phosphor schematic in LED TV backlight 327

Figure 128: The Wall microLED display 327

Figure 129: Carbon nanotubes flexible, rechargeable yarn batteries incorporated into flexible, rechargeable yarn batteries 328

Figure 130: Ink-jet printed 5-inch AM-QLED display (80 dpi) 329

Figure 131: Flexible LCD 329

Figure 132: “Full ActiveTM Flex” 330

Figure 133: FOLED schematic 331

Figure 134: Foldable display331

Figure 135: Stretchable AMOLED 332

Figure 136: LGD 12.3” FHD Automotive OLED 332

Figure 137: LECTUM® display 333

Figure 138: Flexible & stretchable LEDs based on quantum dots 333

Figure 139: QD-TV unit sales 2016-2030, conservative estimates 334

Figure 140: QD-TV unit sales 2016-2030, optimistic estimates 335

Figure 141: QD Monitor Unit sales 2015-2030 336

Figure 142: Transistor architecture trend chart 358

Figure 143: CMOS Technology Roadmap 359

Figure 144: Emerging logic devices 362

Figure 145: Figure 38: Thin film transistor incorporating CNTs 365

Figure 146: Graphene IC in wafer tester 367

Figure 147: Emerging logic devices 370

Figure 148: Schematic of NRAM cell 385

Figure 149: A schematic diagram for the mechanism of the resistive switching in metal/GO/Pt386

Figure 150: Phone coated in WaterBlock submerged in water tank 396

Figure 151: Demo solar panels coated with nanocoatings 399

Figure 152: Schematic of barrier nanoparticles deposited on flexible substrates 401

Figure 153: Schematic of anti-fingerprint nanocoatings403

Figure 154: Toray anti-fingerprint film (left) and an existing lipophilic film (right) 404

Figure 155: Schematic of AR coating utilizing nanoporous coating 405

Figure 156: Schematic of KhepriCoat®Image credit: DSM 406

Figure 157: Nanocoating submerged in water 408

Figure 158: Solar cell with nanowires and graphene electrode 421

Figure 159: Schematic illustration of the fabrication concept for textile-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) made by sewing textile electrodes onto cloth or paper 425

Figure 160: (a) Schematic of Schottky barrier quantum dots based solar cell 429

Figure 161: Schematic of QD Solar Cell 430

Figure 162: Doped quantum dot LSC 430

Figure 163: QD coated solar windows 431

Figure 164: A layer of highly emissive manganese-doped quantum dots onto the outside surface of the outer glass pane (top layer on the left image below) and a layer of copper indium selenide quantum dots onto the inner surface of the inside (bottom) pane 432

Figure 165: QDSSC Module 432

Figure 166: Total QD photovoltaics component revenues 2013-2030 ($100,000s), conservative and optimistic estimates 434

Figure 167: Fourth generation QD-LEDs 440

Figure 168: LG OLED flexible lighting panel 442

Figure 169: Flexible OLED incorporated into automotive headlight 442

Figure 170: Flexible & stretchable LEDs based on quantum dots 443

Figure 171: Total nanotechnology lighting component revenues 2013-2027 ($M), conservative and optimistic estimates 445

Figure 172: Hybrid graphene phototransistors 451

Figure 173: Schematic of QD laser device 453

Figure 174: GFET sensors 466

Figure 175: First generation point of care diagnostics 468

Figure 176: Graphene Field Effect Transistor Schematic 469

 

Date of Publication:
Mar 7, 2019
File Format:
PDF via E-mail
Number of Pages:
510 Pages