Semiconductor Manufacturing

Date of Publication: Nov 19, 2015

A number of technical and operational trends within the semiconductor manufacturing industry are strengthening the need for more effective advanced equipment solutions. These trends include: Development of Smaller Semiconductor Features. The development of smaller features, now as small as 20nm in production and 10nm in R&D, enables semiconductor manufacturers to produce larger numbers of circuits per wafer and to achieve higher circuit performance. Transition to 3D device structures. Foundries are adopting 3D FinFET transistors starting at 14/16 nm technology nodes to get improved performance and use less power in 1x technology nodes. Memory makers will move to 3D NAND and vertical structures for next generation NAND technology. Transition to 3D Integration Technology. Three-dimensional (3D) integration of active devices, directly connecting multiple IC chips, offers many benefits, including power efficiency, performance enhancements, significant product miniaturization, and cost reduction.

Date of Publication: Nov 11, 2015
This report profiles the top 29 Asian (Japan, Korea, Taiwan) Companies making semiconductor process equipment.  The report analyzes market shares for 29 equipment sectors, which includes Asian and Non-Asian manufacturers. Market forecasts to 2018 are presented for all 29 equipment sectors. Asia-based semiconductor equipment makers will see their combined share of the global equipment sales shrink in 2015.

Date of Publication: Nov 6, 2015
The worldwide semiconductor foundry market has been growing steadily in recent years, thanks to the demand for smartphones, computers, wearables, and IoT (Internet of Things) application devices. Advanced processes have been the major driving force behind the growth. For this reason, IDMs such as Intel and Samsung have been deploying in 14nm and 10nm process technologies, thereby shaking the leadership of TSMC's market share. This report profiles the competition among Intel, Samsung, and TSMC - from the perspective of technology deployment, manufacturing capabilities, and customer relationship - and analyzes the future development of the semiconductor foundry market.

Date of Publication: Nov 3, 2015
At the time of the alleged 2010 embargo, Chinese firms accounted for 97 percent of rare-earth oxide production and a large fraction of the processing business that turns these into rare earth metals, alloys, and products like magnets. This near-monopoly was in a market with surging demand and intense political resonance in consuming countries. And the most dependent countries—primarily Japan and the United States, but also several European states—happened to be those over which China most wanted influence. Prices soared in the REE spot market in the wake of China’s 2010 export cuts, especially as downstream users—companies that incorporate REEs into other products—filled inventories to protect themselves from future disruptions. Downstream markets are already adjusting to the changing supply picture through normal market mechanisms. This report presents a forecast of REE for a variety of technologies: semiconductors, HDDs, FPDs, mobile devices, LEDs, and alternative energy

Date of Publication: Oct 28, 2015
The MEMS Cost and Price Model is designed to easily calculate the manufacturing cost and selling price of most MEMS products. The model supports up to two MEMS die and up to two IC die in the same package with packaging and test costs. The model forward forecasts out to 2020. 100mm to 200mm wafer sizes are supported. Wafer fabrication, test and packaging costs are all covered. The price includes twelve months of upgrades with phone and email support.

Date of Publication: Oct 27, 2015
In this report we identify and forecast areas of semiconductor-related technologies where a small or mid-sized company can compete. These high-tech applications segmented as those are fabricated on 300mm wafers and those built on non-300mm wafers. The small business even with their limited resources can better serve these market segments by offering customized offerings, because the products of the big business will often be too generic to suit the needs of a niche market audience

Date of Publication: Nov 12, 2015

This report analyzes the wearable industry and markets for the two wearable camps described above. Forecasts are also presented for semiconductor content and markets for MEMs devices, sensors, CPUs and low-power MPUs, GPS, and connectivity chips. Wearables are small electronic devices, often consisting of one or more sensors and having computational capability. They are embedded into items that attach to the body, such as a user’s head, feet, arms, wrists and waist. They can resemble a watch, eyeglasses, clothing, contact lenses, shoes or even jewelery. Wearables either capture data or present data. The types of data collected could be as simple as the number of steps taken in a day or as complex as ECG or brainwave measurements. For output, wearables can convey information to the user through a variety of means, from the blinking of an LED light to a complex display of data.